5 Reasons to Become a Scribe Before Medical School

5 Reasons to Become a Scribe Before Medical School

Medical scribes are assistants who work very closely with the doctors in clinic and hospital settings and are trained to perform several different tasks including transcribing interviews and examinations, logging patient info on EMR systems, and arranging a physician’s schedule. Training and then becoming a medical scribe offers you firsthand experience working closely with practicing physicians. It is also a good step to take if you are planning on going to medical school. Becoming a medical scribe can be what gives you the edge and hands on training you want.

Things to Think About Before Hiring a Medical Scribe

Things to Think About Before Hiring a Medical Scribe

Medical scribes are becoming increasingly popular throughout the American medical community and are a viable way to help solve the problem of growing paperwork and other administrative duties. While EMR systems are being used in several facilities, it still may not fit in with the way that the facilities and physician's run and how they do things. A medical scribe can help take pressure off of a physician, help to improve patient satisfaction, and can help the office run smoothly and efficiently so the physicians can take a break every occasionally, and spend more one on one time with their patients.

ProScribe’s Virtual Scribe App, SoGo (Scribe on the Go)

ProScribe’s Virtual Scribe App, SoGo (Scribe on the Go)

Scribes are enlisted to help with productivity in hospitals, clinics, and other medical offices and are considered the go-to person for the physician of the facility. A good medical scribe can handle what is thrown at them including administrative and front office tasks, transcribing patient appointments, logging prescription records, setting up appointments, and retrieving patient results.

Physician Burnout Affects Every Stage Of A Career

Physician Burnout Affects Every Stage Of A Career

The residency period is infamously hard, a grueling schedule that makes sure physicians are ready for the responsibility, tough choices, and difficult time management that come with being a part of the medical profession.  Burnout is common enough that many residency programs are adopting rules and guidelines to make them easier to survive, but it’s becoming more and more common and affecting physicians of every specialty and every age.